Arlington Water Utilities Sees High Use, Encourages Residents to be Water Wise

Arlington Water Utilities customers used an average of 75 million gallons a day in  June, nearly 30 percent more water on average than in June 2017. It’s a  trend that’s not surprising given the recent hot, dry weather.

The good news is Lake Arlington and the East Texas reservoirs that supply Arlington water are full enough to meet demand this summer. No day-of-the-week watering restrictions are expected for Arlington. Though, residents who are aware of their home water use can avoid unpleasant surprises on their utility bills.​

More than half of Arlington’s water meters are equipped with advanced metering infrastructure or AMI technology, with more new AMI meters being added each day. For customers with AMI meters, customer service representatives can access daily water use trends – information that may help residents save water and money. If you suspect you may have a leak, a list of troubleshooting tips to try at home is available here: http://www.arlington-tx.gov/water/common-issues/water-leaks/.

Arlington Water’s customer service representatives are available to answer questions about water use and billing at 817-275-5931 and via email at water@arlingtontx.gov. Arlington Water’s website, Facebook, and Twitter pages also offer tips and information all year long to help customers be water wise.

During the summer time, it’s good to remember:

  • Drought conditions may continue. As of July 3, 82 percent of the state was in some level of drought conditions, according to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. City code prohibits irrigation of lawns and landscape between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m. daily, with exceptions for hand watering and the use of soaker hoses. To learn more, visit the City of Code of Ordinance page, Water and Sewer chapter, section 4.27. 
  • Arlington Water rates are some of the best in the state. Using 5,000 gallons of water in Arlington costs a residential user about $22.71 on average. That’s 40 percent less than the state average, according to a recent study by the Texas Municipal League. It’s also less than a half a penny per gallon. The city’s rate structure is designed to reward customers who use water efficiently. More information is available here.
  • As part of a long-range water conservation effort to reduce water use, Arlington Water Utilities and the Tarrant Regional Water District, our water supplier, offer a limited number of free sprinkler system check-ups for Arlington residents. Click here to find out more. TRWD also offers weekly watering advice sent to your email or via text. To sign up, visit waterisawesome.com.
  • Though Arlington residents and businesses are using water at a higher rate this summer, the demand hasn’t reached levels from the state’s driest year on record – 2011. In June 2011, Arlington Water was pumping out an average of 86 million gallons per day to its customers. By July, that average daily production had grown to almost 107 million gallons per day to meet demand.
  • Visit Tarrant Regional Water District’s Water Is Awesome website for tips on saving water indoors and outdoors. Click here for a list of additional water conservation resources.

 

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2 Comments on "Arlington Water Utilities Sees High Use, Encourages Residents to be Water Wise"

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Julia Burgen
Guest

How does Arlington’s increased water usage numbers calculate with respect to 1. additional water outlet customers and or with 2. calculated weather norms? Increases in housing and business construction will logically increase water usage and I assume we want to keep getting bigger?

Susan Schrock
Admin

Thank you for your question. Our rates are re-calculated each year based on methods endorsed by the American Water Works Association. Several factors are considered – including the number of active connections and water use in the most recent year and anticipated costs in the coming year for expenses such as electricity, chemical costs, maintenance, capital programs and wastewater transmission and treatment. Weather trends do play a role in calculations of how much water we expect to purchase for treatment in the coming year.

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